Tips

It is always a good idea to read through the pattern before beginning, so as to get the general idea of the flow of events. I always work the back first, in case there are any size corrections. These can then be adjusted on the front. Also, on the back, you don't have to deal with any neck shaping, so it's easier to start there.

I prefer to join knitted pieces and reinforce edges with crochet, which produces durable seams and firm edges. Particularly useful is crocheting up and down the front bands. A simple slip stitch accomplishes this cleanly.

Slip, wrap, turn: This is the most widely asked question. Abbreviated s.w.t, the purpose of slip, wrap, turn is to prevent a hole from forming when working the short rows on the sleeve cap. Because the sleeve is knitted from the top down, and is knitted directly from the armhole, a different process is required. Short rows are used, which get progressively longer until all of the stitches along the armhole are engaged. If the first short row is purled, then, after purling the required number of stitches, you slip the next stitch from the left needle to the right. Since the yarn is in the back, you bring the yarn forward to the front. You then slip that same stitch back to the left needle from the right needle. The work is then turned, and you are ready to begin the next row. Notice that you are not working the stitch in any way - you are simply moving it from the left needle to the right, and then back to the left needle. In the interim, you have wrapped the yarn around it. This wrap pulls the stitch closer and keeps a hole from forming. On the next row, let's say you are knitting back. After knitting the required number of stitches, you slip the next stitch from the left needle to the right. Since the yarn is in the front, you bring now bring the yarn to the back. The stitch is then slipped back to the left needle. Each short row engages progressively more stitches until all of the stitches are in work.